Entries for month: August 2016

At the Olympics in Rio!

If you follow any international news or sports, you're following the Rio Olympics. Here is this American ESTJ's perspective.
 
Before I arrived, I was reading newscasts about mosquitoes, robberies, protestors, impeachment, etc.  Here I find very little evidence of any of that. 

I did happen to spot some broken window panes in the Rio de Janeiro Parliament building.  This building was the home of the national Capitol until it moved to Brasilia in 1960.
 
I asked our student guide if the broken windows were from Olympic protestors.  He said that in a way they were.  He has not been able to attend classes for the last four months because his university is shut down.  Why?  The professors and staff have not been paid and are on strike.  The protests were about money going to the Olympic Games, instead of education or other needed social services, let alone infrastructure to clean up the water.
 
And the games go on.  There are hordes of people excited about the Olympics.  There are also lots of armed soldiers near every major venue and gathering point.  

Subways and trains are packed, not only with the locals but also with people from all over the world.  You hear lots of languages.  People are friendly and helpful, even those not wearing the bright yellow jackets signifying them as helpers. They are calling out directions to trains to the venues in both Portuguese and English.

Security lines to get into the venues seem to be running smoothly now.  We're lucky to be in the preferential lines due to our age of over 65.  Museums also often give free membership to those my age, and half price to those 62-64.
 
Attending an Athletics (Track and Field) session is like watching a three ring circus.  There are usually several events going on at the same time - pole vaulting, running, discus, and shotput can all be happening simultaneously.
 
And depending on where you are sitting you either see the competitors looking the size of an ant or you can see a real person!  If you're up high, watching a long race while the runners spread out, they look like a snake.  And in the steeplechase when they jump over hurdles, they look like a snake going over a lump.  No, those were not my images; they came from my Intuitive friends.

Etiquette at a track meet is interesting.  The Brazilians have gotten so excited over their athletes that they cheer loudly even at the moment when the starter needs to shoot the gun.  No one can hear, so now there are calls from all over the stadium for silence.
 
And so as not to block the view of others behind you, you are supposed to stay in your seat and not stand up and cheer for your favorite athlete.  The one time that is not followed is when Usain Bolt (the fastest man on earth!) appears; all sorts of people are there who do not usually go to track, so everyone stands up with excitement because they these folks don’t know track etiquette.

No "booing" is supposed to occur since we are honoring the achievements of every athlete around the world.  However, that rule has been broken several times, which really does tarnish the games. 

The medal ceremony is the one time when all eyes focus on one place and everyone stands for national anthem of the gold medalist’s country.  That is a really good feeling!

This is an exciting time to be in Rio and to be a citizen of the world.

 

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Preparing for the Rio Olympics!

I’m going to the Olympics in Rio! I had the opportunity to go to the Beijing Olympics in 2008, so this one will be an interesting contrast.

How do I prepare as an ESTJ?  As you know, preparation is pretty important to people of my type!

Part of travelling is learning what I really need and when to just let go.  Long ago, I made it part of my routine to acknowledge that I would inevitably forget something or need something I never thought of packing.  My goal is to figure out what that is as soon as possible and to logically analyze where and how to get it! 

There is my somewhat cautious SJ side that says watch out for mosquitoes, robbers, and bad water, etc.  I hope to handle those negative possibilities with a bit of preparation along with actions to minimize my risks – take mosquito repellent, carry only small amounts of cash, drink bottled water and bring antibiotics, just in case.

There is my Extraverted side – so much to do and so much to see.  I need to make sure I don’t get worn out.

There’s my ESTJ "take charge" side. I’ll be travelling with several others and I need to remember to take other’s needs into account.  I can’t order them around and expect to build relationships.  Luckily the tickets we already have will do some of that structuring for us!

The Olympics is all about organization, something I love. I’m fascinated by how others structure events.  At the Olympic track and field venue, there is a timetable that is rigorously applied; huge timers are always counting out the number of minutes and seconds until the next track and field event starts.  It will be interesting to see how the Latin culture handles the time issue.

I really don’t follow sports that much.  For me, watching the field workers set up the events sometimes is more interesting than the actual events. 

For example, with all those throwing events (hammer, discus, javelin) I don’t know good form from bad form.  I can understand long throws and short ones.  But what I like best is watching the little remote control cars that the field helper puts the thrown object into and then the person with the remote control speeds back to the athletes. 

I admire the helpers in the trucks who set up the hurdles quickly and then take them down quickly; it’s a study in efficiency.  Love it!! 

So, look for me in the crowds at the track and field finals, the team synchronized swimming, and the women’s diving.  I’ll be waving directly at you!!

 

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